Three Times That Israel Rejected Its Right to Exist

Comrade Morlock
4 min readNov 5, 2023

I used to argue that Israel’s right to exist was clear — United Nations Resolution 181 granted it in 1947. But on reading more about Zionism and Israel, something else became clear — Israel has rejected its right to exist ever since the UN granted it.

Three events scream this is true.

  1. In 1948, Israel rejected its right to exist by rejecting its UN borders.

By the end of the war, Israel had conquered 78 percent of Palestine; three-quarters of a million Palestinians had been made refugees; over 500 towns and villages had been obliterated; and a new map was drawn up, in which every city, river and hillock received a new, Hebrew name, as all vestiges of the Palestinian culture were to be erased. For decades Israel denied the existence of this population, former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir once saying: “There is no such thing as a Palestinian.”[6]

2. In 1949, Israel rejected its right to exist by agreeing to repatriate the Palestinians who had fled in terror, then reneging on its vow.

“The [Lausanne] conference officially opened on 27 April 1949. On 12 May the [UN’s] Palestine Conciliation Committee reaped its only success when it induced the parties to sign a joint protocol on the framework for a comprehensive peace. . Israel for the first time accepted the principle of repatriation [of the Arab refugees] and the internationalization of Jerusalem. . .[but] they did so as a mere exercise in public relations aimed at strengthening Israel’s international image…Walter Eytan, the head of the Israeli delegation, [stated]..’My main purpose was to begin to undermine the protocol of 12 May, which we had signed only under duress of our struggle for admission to the U.N. Refusal to sign would…have immediately been reported to the Secretary-General and the various governments.’” Israeli historian, Ilan Pappe, “The Making of the Arab-Israel Conflict, 1947–1951.”

“The Preamble of this resolution of admission included a safeguarding clause as follows: ‘Recalling its resolution of 29 November 1947 (on partition) and 11 December 1948 (on reparation and…

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Comrade Morlock

If you’re losing an argument with me and are too proud to admit defeat, please feel free to insult me instead.